Evaluation of the Prescription Writing Pattern of Interns for Common Diseases in Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Iran, in 2013

AUTHORS

Mohammad Mahdi Hayatbakhsh-Abbasi 1 , Gholamreza Sepehri 2 , habibeh ahmadipour 3 , Sina Bakhshaei 4 , *

1 Specialist in Internal Diseases, Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran, Iran

2 Ph.D. in Pharmacology, Professor, Department of Pharmacology, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran, Iran

3 Specialist in Community Medicine, Assistant Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran, Iran

4 General Practitioner, Family Physician, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran, Iran

How to Cite: Hayatbakhsh-Abbasi M M , Sepehri G, ahmadipour H, Bakhshaei S . Evaluation of the Prescription Writing Pattern of Interns for Common Diseases in Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Iran, in 2013 , Strides Dev Med Educ. 2016 ; 13(1):e58098.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Strides in Development of Medical Education: 13 (1); e58098
Published Online: April 27, 2016
Article Type: Research Article
Received: July 15, 2017
Accepted: August 25, 2015

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Abstract

Background & Objective: Rational prescription of medicine by physicians is one of the most important factors in the correct and complete treatment of patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate prescription writing patterns of graduating interns for common illnesses in Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Iran, in 2013.

Methods: In this descriptive, cross-sectional study, the prescription writing pattern of 50 interns of Kerman University of Medical Sciences were evaluated. A written exam assessing prescription writing on 30 common clinical cases was held. Data were analyzed using SPSS software.

Results: The average number of items per each prescription was 2.07. The frequency of medicines prescribed by their generic name and from the World Health Organization (WHO) list of essential medicines was 96.8% and 97.1%, respectively. Drug interaction was observed in 5.6% of prescriptions. The frequency of prescriptions containing antibiotics, injectable medicines, and corticosteroids was 47.2%, 9.3%, and 6.5%, respectively. The most common groups prescribed were antibiotics and analgesics.

Conclusion: Based on the WHO recommended standards, the prescription of antibiotics by interns of Kerman University of Medical Sciences was irrational and inappropriate. Therefore, educational interventions are necessary to improve prescription writing patterns among interns.

Keywords

Prescription writing pattern Interns World Health Organization Antibiotics

© 2016, Medical Education Development Center. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.

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