The Use of Cumulative Disciplinary Score in an Integrated Curriculum to Prevent Deliberate Omission of Course Content

AUTHORS

Sara Mortaz Hejri 1 , * , Azim Mirzazadeh 2 , Mohammad Jalili 3 , Hamid Emadi Kochak 4

AUTHORS INFORMATION

1 MD., Ph.D. Candidate in Medical Education, Department of Medical Education, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Iran

2 Specialist in Internal Medicine, Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Iran

3 Specialist in Emergency Medicine, Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Iran

4 Specialist in Infectious Diseases, Associate Professor, Department of Infectious Diseases, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Iran

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Strides in Development of Medical Education: 12 (1); e59613
Published Online: January 28, 2015
Article Type: Research Article
Received: August 07, 2017
Accepted: August 18, 2014

Crossmark

CHEKING

READ FULL TEXT
Abstract

Background & Objective: Student assessment is one of the most challenging issues of an integrated curriculum. While calculating an overall score is in line with the goals of integrated curriculum, it poses the risk that some students will deliberately leave out the content of some disciplines, based on the fact that they have lower credits in each block exam. In the present study, we describe the experience of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, where an integrated medical curriculum has been launched since September 2011 as part of curriculum reform initiative.

Methods: In the first academic year, students passed 4 blocks: Molecule and Cell; Tissue; Development and Function; Cardiovascular Function; Blood circulation; and Blood-Respiratory Function. Each block included anatomy, histology, physiology, and embryology. The overall block score was reported at the end of each block. In addition, a cumulative disciplinary score was calculated at the end of the academic year through the summation of the weighted subscores of each discipline in each block.

Results: At the end of the year, the number of students who had failed in histology, anatomy, embryology, and physiology were 15, 17, 44, and 3, respectively. They were required to take a disciplinary examination before the beginning of the next academic year.

Conclusion: A comparison of the number of students who failed disciplines with low credits (e.g. histology) with those who failed disciplines with high credits (e.g. physiology) suggests that the former had systematically been ignored by some students. The calculation of a cumulative disciplinary score may reduce the deliberate omission of course content in integrated blocks.

Keywords

Integration Student assessment Cumulative disciplinary score

© 2015, Strides in Development of Medical Education. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
Fulltext

 

Full text is available in pdf

 

 

References
  • 1. Reference is available in pdf
  • COMMENTS

    LEAVE A COMMENT HERE: